Blog

The Woodruff Lab contributes to the Women’s Health Research Institute and Oncofertility Consortium blogs. Read the latest information disseminated from these blogs below:  

NIH Bolsters Sex-based Research

 National Institutes of Health has invested $10.1 million in supplemental funding to bolster the research of 82 grantees to explore the effects of sex in preclinical and clinical studies.

Experts recommend change in labeling for low-dose vaginal estrogen

As more post menopausal women change to a low dose local vaginal estrogen to control vaginal atrophy, a group of experts have recommended that the FDA modify the package Black Box Warning label  on the product packaging.  The current warning is based on research done mainly on oral estrogen which is a systemic rather than local therapy.   The local low-dose therapy, in fact, was designed to reduce estrogen exposure to the woman while still providing localized (vaginal) relief from vaginal atrophy.   The panel of experts who wrote the editorial published in th

Sex inclusion study cited in ‘Atlantic’

The lack of females in basic research was highlighted by the Atlantic today.  Melina R. Kibbe, MD and Teresa K Woodruff, PhD, two of the co-authors of a study published in Surgery this month, reported that 22% of the publications in five high-impact surgical journals between 2011 and 2012 did not specify  the sex of their animal subjects, and of those that did, 80% only used male animals.

FDA to address diversity in new drug and device studies

The Women’s Health Research Institute at Northwestern University applauds the recent release of a new Action Plan developed the Food in Drug Administration in response to a Congressional directive to look closer at the inclusion and analysis of demographic subgroups including women and minorities in applications for new drugs and devices.

Should competition adjust for size?

Last night I watched American Ninja Warrior because Internet sensation Kacy Catanzaro, a 5 ft, 100 lb athlete, was the only women competing in the American Ninja Warrior Finals. Despite 2 years of training, she simply could not complete the “jumping spider” obstacle part of the course last night.   In the replays, you could see that her legs connected well with  the walls, but her arms could not span the gap adequately.   Evidently she worked hard on this task and likely made it during practice but men (or women) with wider arm spans have a greater likelihood of connecting with a wall with ‘all fours’.

Five major journals to include sex in studies!

Melina Kibbe, MD  reported in a new study that surgical researchers rarely use female animals or cells in the published studies—despite a huge body of evidence showing that sex differences can play a critical role in medical research.  “Women make up half the population, but in surgical literature, 80 percent of the studies only include males,” said Kibbe.  Published Aug. 28 in the journal Surgery, the study follows a “60 Minutes” segment aired in February that featured Dr.