Blog

The Woodruff Lab contributes to the Women’s Health Research Institute and Oncofertility Consortium blogs. Read the latest information disseminated from these blogs below:  

Adoption and Oncofertility: Another Option for Cancer Survivors

A recent feature in Cure magazine discusses adoption as another option for cancer survivors who want to build a family. Each patient is unique. The impact of a given treatment on fertility can vary and so can the time available before starting life saving treatments. Patient age, marital status, personal wishes, religious and cultural constraints and prognosis may all affect decision making. While some patients may lose reproductive function as a result of their treatment, third-party reproductive options are available for survivors.  This article explores adoption as one of the many options for patients and gives a better understanding of the adoptive process including costs and potential pitfalls and challenges patients may face. To read the story in its entirety, please click here.

Top 20 Articles in Reproduction and Endocrinology

Dr. Woodruff’s article “Reproductive endocrinology: fertility in female survivors of childhood cancer” was recently listed as one of the top 20 articles in the field of reproduction and endocrinology since 2013. This article was listed at the 8th most influential in the list of 20. Dr. Woodruff’s impact in the field of reproduction and endocrinology remains clear and she joins of the likes of other highly influential scholars on the list. Congratulations to Dr. Woodruff for this honor!

The entire list is now available on the website and can be accessed here.

Congresswoman Schakowsky cites WHRI in testimony

On July 12, Janet Woodcock, MD, Director, Center for Drug Evaluation & Research at the FDA appeared before the Subcommittee on Health of the Congressional Energy and Commerce Committee.  Congresswoman Jan Schakowsky (pictured) questioned the Director about the inclusion of equal number of women in drug studies that are often male biased.   The  Women’s Health Research Institute at Northwestern provided background information for the Congresswoman on the topic which she acknowledged.

National Action Plan on Infertility Released

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released the final version of its National Public Health Action Plan for the Detection, Prevention and Management of Infertility.  The National Action Plan developed over the course of seven years and began with an ad hoc working group that included members of the Oncofertility Consortium that started at Northwestern.    A draft National Action Plan was released in May 2012.

Microchip contraceptive with on/off switch?

Women may soon bid farewell to birth control pills and welcome a new type of contraception in the form of microchip implants. An MIT startup backed by the Bill Gates Foundation plans to start pre-clinical testing for the birth control chip next year and pave the way for a possible market debut in 2018.

Inclusion of women in medical device studies critical!

Most people know that human clinical trials are critical to prove safety and efficacy in new medications.   This is also true for medical devices yet a recent study indicated that only 14% of device studies included sex as a key outcome measure, and only 4% included a subgroup analysis for female participants.    The differences in anatomy and physiology, as well as other factors in men and women,  can lead to devices working less effectively and safely.

Having babies later may extend life

Women who had their last child at age 33 years or older were more likely to reach extremes of longevity, according to an analysis published online June 23 in Menopause.
Women who had their last child when they were aged 33 to 37 years were twice as likely to reach the extreme fifth percentile of longevity compared with women who had their last child before that age.

Adopting healthy habits in your 30s can decrease heart disease risk.

The heart is more forgiving than you may think — especially to adults who try to take charge of their health, a new Northwestern Medicine® study has found.

When adults in their 30s and 40s decide to drop unhealthy habits that are harmful to their heart and embrace healthy lifestyle changes, they can control and potentially even reverse the natural progression of coronary artery disease, scientists found.