Blog

The Woodruff Lab contributes to the Women’s Health Research Institute and Oncofertility Consortium blogs. Read the latest information disseminated from these blogs below:  

Women and Bleeding Disorders

Bleeding disorders refer to conditions that keep your blood from clotting properly after a cut or injury.   Women generally notice a problem because of heavy or abnormal menstrual periods.  Heavy bleeding or menses is one of the most common problems women report to their doctors.   In the U.S., one out of every five women report heavy bleeding.

Signs of a possible bleeding disorder include:

Highly Active Women Gain Less Weight than Men

People will gain significantly less weight by middle age – especially women – if they engage in moderate to vigorous activity nearly every day of the week starting as young adults, according to new Northwestern Medicine research.

Women particularly benefitted from high activity over 20 years, gaining an average of 13 pounds less than those with low activity; while men with high activity gained about 6 pounds less than their low-activity peers. High activity included recreational exercise such as basketball, running, brisk walking or an exercise class or daily activities such as housework or construction work.

Study Shows Gender Difference in Sleep Interruptions

Working mothers are two-and-a-half times as likely as working fathers to interrupt their sleep to take care of others.

That is the finding of a University of Michigan study providing the first known nationally representative data documenting substantial gender differences in getting up at night, mainly with babies and small children. And women are not only more likely to get up at night to care for others, their sleep interruptions last longer—an average of 44 minutes for women, compared to about 30 minutes for men.

U.S. Not Meeting Key Women’s Health Goals

10-Year State-by-State Report Card in Women’s Health

  • Good: Less Cigarette Smoking, More Colorectal Cancer Screening

  • Bad: Fewer Pap Tests, More Chlamydia, More Binge Drinking

The United States has failed to meet most goals for women’s health — largely federal objectives drawn from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Healthy People 2010 agenda — according to a report released today on the status of women’s health by the National Women’s Law Center (NWLC) and Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU).