Blog

Affirmative Action Law Benefits Women in India

 Hillary Clinton changed the way Americans think about women in politics, and new Northwestern University research suggests that an affirmative action law in India is doing the same for Indian women. The research, published Jan. 12 in the journal Science, focused on the long-term outcomes of a law that reserved leadership positions for women in randomly selected village councils in India.

Top Women’s Health Stories for 2011

The Institute for Women’s Health Research at Northwestern University publishes a monthly e-newsletter on timely issues in women’s health. Our January 2012 edition focuses on scientific breakthroughs and public policies that we think could influence future research and the clinical care women women receive.   We call these ‘game changers’.

statins and diabetes

Older women who take statins may be at an increased risk for developing type 2 diabetes, researchers found.   In an analysis of data from the Women’s Health Initiative, postmenopausal women who were on a statin at study entry had almost a 50% greater risk of diabetes than those who weren’t on the cholesterol-lowering drugs, Yunsheng Ma, MD, PhD, of the University of Massachusetts School of Medicine, and colleagues reported online in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Webinar Explains How to Report Bad Reactions to Cosmetics


Reaction to henna

From morning until night—styling our hair for work to showering before bed—Americans depend upon personal care products. Most are safe, but some may cause problems, and that’s when FDA gets involved.
FDA collects information about consumers’ bad reactions to products it regulates. If you have a reaction to a beauty, personal hygiene, or makeup product, FDA wants to hear from you.
In this 30-minute webinar, learn:

HPV vaccine does not promote sexual activity

Despite some assumptions to the contrary, young women who receive recommended vaccinations to prevent human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and associated cancers do not engage in more sexually risky behavior. That is the cautious determination of a national study by The Centers for Disease Control & Prevention reported in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Lead study author Nicole C. Liddon, Ph.D. advised against drawing too broad a conclusion from the study, while explaining the motivation behind it.

The handwritten letter: a thing of the past?

Today, I walked by a filled meeting room and overheard someone say,  ” I never open my paper mail any more.”   It sounded like the group was discussing email banking and other electronic transactions.   Though I still pay my bills by snail mail, I recognize  the potential benefits of the latest phone and computer apps–I’m just not ready for it!    Email and facebook has reconnected families and opened communications lines that enable busy, overworked people to keep you posted on their latest activities.

 

 

 

Battling Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD)

This time of year, the shorter days and lack of sunlight can cause some people to feel depressed. Seasonal Affective Disorder, or SAD, affects between 10 to 20 percent of Americans, primarily younger adults and women. Although the exact cause of SAD is unknown, experts believe changes in melatonin and serotonin levels, or a disruption in the body’s internal clock may be to blame. John Stracks, MD, from Northwestern Integrative Medicine says there are ways to beat the blues caused by SAD and suggests those who experience symptoms visit their doctor before symptoms become severe.

Bring in the New Year with better food safety habits

Some people don’t take food poisoning very seriously. Maybe that’s because the symptoms usually are not long-lasting in most healthy people—a few hours or a few days—and usually go away without medical treatment. But foodborne illness can be severe, even life-threatening to anyone, especially those most at risk such as older adults, infants and young children, pregnant women, and people with HIV/AIDS, cancer, or any condition that weakens their immune systems.

More Knee Replacement Surgery Due to Baby Boomers

Women and men between the ages of 45 and 64 were more than twice as likely to have had knee replacement surgery in 2009 than in 1997, recent data from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) show.  The rates among women were even higher. Knee replacement surgery is most common in people whose knees have been damaged by osteoarthritis (OA), rheumatoid arthritis, or injury. Due to their age and fondness for sports, Baby Boomers fit neatly into each category.

The percentage of people who have osteoarthritis, the most common type of arthritis, grows with age. About 27 million Americans have this condition, and, after age 45, it is more common in women. Osteoarthritis occurs when the cartilage that coats the end of each bone breaks down. This can cause the bones to rub against each other, causing pain and stiffness.